"The Christianity of history is not Protestantism. If ever there were a safe truth it is this, and Protestantism has ever felt it so; to be deep in history is to cease to be a Protestant." (-John Henry Newman, An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine).

"Where the bishop is, there let the people gather; just as where ever Jesus Christ is, there is the Catholic Church". -St. Ignatius of Antioch (ca 110 AD)a martyr later thrown to the lions, wrote to a church in Asia Minor. Antioch was also where the term "Christian" was first used.

“But if I should be delayed, you should know how to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and foundation of truth.” 1 Timothy 3:15

"This is the sole Church of Christ, which in the Creed we profess to be one, holy, catholic and apostolic." -CCC 811

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Is CONFESSION Scriptural?

Much to the attention of the world, Filipinos in the Philippines once more display its antagonistic approach against the Catholic Church, on priests and on Pope Francis who was featured in international news having CONFESSION to an ordinary priest.  In this article Bold move: Pope Francis confesses sins to ordinary priest bad comments are trending.  Obviously comments from atheists, agnostics, anti-Catholics, unbelievers and anti-Christians (yet so coward to confront other religions such as Islam and the Moslems).
Pope Francis having confession to an ordinary priest at the Vatican (Photo source: DailyMail.co.uk)
Here are some few comments to start with:




    • why would anyone confess their sins to a man?



      I'm not worried about the Pope. I'm worried a lot about the ordinary priests taking confessions from their co-priests. Priest A (taking confessions from Priest B): You did? How many times? I thought I was the only one. Was it the acolyte or that girl choir membe
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        The local catholic hypocrite officials should take heed from none other than their POPE in Vatican,who is becoming a model in simplicity and humbleness.I would like to imagine how our Cardinals,Archbishops,Bishops,and some priests who are sinners ranging from being GAYS,PEDOPHILES,CORRUPT,HYPOCRITES,who,Interferes with purely state affairs.,will go CONFESSION with an ordinary priests.WILL THEY CONFESS THEIR SINS??,Will they tell the truth???
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            The Celebrity Pope is putting on a good show. TMZ reports that the Pope is also praying at night before going to bed.
            The actual transcript of the Pope's confessions has recently been released. It reveals some amazing insights:
            Pope: "Forgive me father for I have sinned... It has been ages since my last confession"
            Priest: "Pope Francis... are you sure this is a good idea?"
            Pope: "Sshhhh... just follow my lead"
            Priest: " Alright. Tell me your sins"
            Pope: "My biggest sin was that I moved a cup from point A to point B and I forgot to turn it over. I could not sleep"
            Priest: "Seriously, Pope..."

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                pero kailagan talaga e picture at ipalabas sa buong mundo? lumang tugtugin nato. Wala epek ito.
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                  CBCP confessions.. This is what I'm waiting for.


                • I wonder what the Pope's sins are. BTW, if Pope is Christ on earth, why would he confess to another priest who's not God but a human being? Why does the Pope not confess directly to God. This is ridiculous.
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                    kala ko ba infallible? pinaglololoko lang kayo jan.. layasan nyo na. Francis, sa Dios ka mangumpisal pati sa pinagkasalaan mo.
                Here is what the CATHOLIC CHURCH proof that CONFESSION is BIBLICAL.  Thanks to Catholic.com for this article:

                The Lord declares inIsaiah 43:25:
                I, I am He who blots out your transgressions for my own sake, and I will not remember your sins.
                Psalm 103:2-3adds:
                Bless the Lord, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits, who forgives all your iniquity, who heals all your diseases…
                Many will use these verses against the idea of confession to a priest. God forgiving sins, they will claim, precludes the possibility of there being a priest who forgives sins. Further, Hebrews 3:1 and 7:22-27tell us Jesus is, “the… high priest of our confession” and that there are not “many priests,” but one in the New Testament—Jesus Christ.Moreover, if Jesus is the “one mediator between God and men” (I Tim. 2:5), how can Catholics reasonably claim priests act in the role of mediator in the Sacrament of Confession?
                BEGINNING WITH THE OLD
                The Catholic Church acknowledges what Scripture unequivocally declares: it is God who forgives our sins. But that is not the end of the story. Leviticus 19:20-22 is equally unequivocal:
                If a man lies carnally with a woman… they shall not be put to death… But he shall bring a guilt offering for himself to the Lord… And the priest shall make atonement for him with the ram of the guilt offering before the Lord for his sin which he has committed; and the sin which he has committed shall be forgiven him.
                Apparently, a priest being used as God’s instrument of forgiveness did not somehow take away from the fact that it was God who did the forgiving. God was the first cause of the forgiveness; the priest was the secondary, or instrumental cause. Thus, God being the forgiver of sins in Isaiah 43:25 and Psalm 103:3 in no way eliminates the possibility of there being a ministerial priesthood established by God to communicate his forgiveness.
                OUT WITH THE OLD
                Many Protestants will concede the point of priests acting as mediators of forgiveness in the Old Testament. “However,” they will claim, “The people of God had priests in the Old Testament. Jesus is our only priest in the New Testament.” The question is: could it be that “our great God and Savior Jesus Christ” (Titus 2:13) did something similar to that which he did, as God, in the Old Testament? Could he have established a priesthood to mediate his forgiveness in the New Testament?
                IN WITH THE NEW
                Just as God empowered his priests to be instruments of forgiveness in the Old Testament, the God/man Jesus Christ delegated authority to his New Testament ministers to act as mediators of reconciliation as well. Jesus made this remarkably clear in John 20:21-23:
                Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, “Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained.”
                Having been raised from the dead, our Lord was here commissioning his apostles to carry on with his work just before he was to ascend to heaven. “As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” What did the Father send Jesus to do? All Christians agree he sent Christ to be the one true mediator between God and men. As such, Christ was to infallibly proclaim the Gospel (cf. Luke 4:16-21), reign supreme as King of kings and Lord of lords (cf. Rev. 19:16); and especially, he was to redeem the world through the forgiveness of sins (cf. I Peter 2:21-25, Mark 2:5-10).

                The New Testament makes very clear that Christ sent the apostles and their successors to carry on this same mission. To proclaim the gospel with the authority of Christ (cf. Matthew 28:18-20), to govern the Church in His stead (cf. Luke 22:29-30), and to sanctify her through the sacraments, especially the Eucharist (cf. John 6:54, I Cor. 11:24-29) and for our purpose here, Confession.
                John 20:22-23 is nothing more than Jesus emphasizing one essential aspect of the priestly ministry of the apostles: To Forgive men’s sins in the person of Christ— “Whose sins you forgive, they are forgiven, whose sins you retain are retained.” Moreover, auricular confession is strongly implied here. The only way the apostles could either forgive or retain sins is by first hearing those sins confessed, and then making a judgment whether or not the penitent should be absolved.
                TO FORGIVE OR TO PROCLAIM?
                Many Protestants and various quasi-Christian sects claim John 20:23must be viewed as Christ simply repeating “the great commission” ofMatthew 28:19 and Luke 24:47 using different words that mean the same thing:
                Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.
                … and that repentance and forgiveness of sins should be preached in his name to all nations…
                Commenting on John 20:23 in his book, Romanism—The Relentless Roman Catholic Assault on the Gospel of Jesus Christ! (White Horse Publications, Huntsville Alabama, 1995), p. 100, Protestant Apologist Robert Zins writes:
                It is apparent that the commission to evangelize is tightly woven into the commission to proclaim forgiveness of sin through faith in Jesus Christ.
                Mr. Zin's claim is that John 20:23 is not saying the apostles would forgive sins; rather, that they would merely proclaim the forgiveness of sins. The only problem with this theory is it runs head-on into the text of John 20. “If you forgive the sins of any… if you retain the sins of any.” The text cannot say it any clearer: this is more than a mere proclamation of the forgiveness of sins—this “commission” of the Lord communicates the power to actually forgive the sins themselves.
                FREQUENT CONFESSION
                The next question for many upon seeing the plain words of St. John is, “Why don’t we hear any more about Confession to a priest in the rest of the New Testament?” The fact is: we don’t need to. How many times does God have to tell us something before we’ll believe it? He only gave us the proper form for baptism once (Matt. 28:19), and yet all Christians accept this teaching.
                But be that as it may, there are multiple texts that deal with Confession and the forgiveness of sins through the New Covenant minister. I will cite just a few of them:
                II Cor. 2:10:
                And to whom you have pardoned anything, I also.  For, what I have pardoned, if I have pardoned anything, for your sakes have I done it in the person of Christ (DRV).
                Many may respond to this text by quoting modern Bible translations, e.g., the RSVCE:
                What I have forgiven, if I have forgiven anything, has been for your sake in the presence of Christ (emphasis added).
                St. Paul, it is argued, is simply forgiving someone in the way any layperson can forgive someone for wrongs committed against him. The Greek word—prosopon—can be translated either way. And I should note here that good Catholics will argue this point as well. This is an understandable and valid objection. However, I do not concur with it for four reasons:
                1. Not only the Douay-Rheims, but the King James Version of the Bible—which no one would accuse of being a Catholic translation—translates prosopon as “person.”
                2. The early Christians, who spoke and wrote in Koine Greek, at the Councils of Ephesus (AD 431) and Chalcedon (AD 451), used prosoponto refer to the “person” of Jesus Christ.
                3. Even if one translates the text as St. Paul pardoning “in the presence of Christ,” the context still seems to indicate that he forgave the sins of others. And notice: St. Paul specifically said he was not forgiving anyone for offenses committed against him (see II Cor. 2:5). Any Christian can and must do this. He said he did the forgiving “for [the Corinthian’s] sakes” and “in the person (or presence) of Christ.” The context seems to indicate he is forgiving sins that do not involve him personally.
                4. Just three chapters later, St. Paul gives us the reason why he could forgive the sins of others: “All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation” (II Cor. 5:18). Some will argue that "the ministry of reconciliation" of verse 18 is identical to "the message of reconciliation" in verse 19. In other words, St. Paul is simply referring to a declarative power here. I don't agree. I argue St. Paul uses distinct terms precisely because he is referring to more than just “the message of reconciliation,” but the same ministry of reconciliation that was Christ’s. Christ did more than just preach a message; he also forgave sins.
                James 5:14-17:
                Is any one among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven.  Therefore confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous man has great power in its effects. Elijah was a man of like nature with ourselves and he prayed fervently that it might not rain… and… it did not rain…
                When it comes to one “suffering;” St. James says, “Let him pray.” “Is any cheerful? Let him sing praise.” But when it comes to sickness and personal sins, he tells his readers they must go to the “elders”—not just anyone—in order to receive this “anointing” and the forgiveness of sins.
                Some will object and point out that verse 16 says to confess our sins “to one another” and pray “for one another.” Is not James just encouraging us to confess our sins to a close friend so we can help one another to overcome our faults?
                The context seems to disagree with this interpretation for two main reasons:
                1. St. James had just told us to go to the presbyter in verse 14 for healing and the forgiveness of sins. Then, verse 16 begins with the word therefore—a conjunction that would seem to connect verse 16 back to verses 14 and 15. The context seems to point to the “elder” as the one to whom we confess our sins.
                2. Ephesians 5:21 employs this same phrase. “Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ.” But the context limits the meaning of “to one another” specifically to a man and wife—not just anyone. Similarly, the context of James 5 would seem to limit the confession of faults “to one another” to the specific relationship between “anyone” and the “elder” or “priest” (Gr.—presbuteros).
                ONE PRIEST OR MANY?
                A major obstacle to Confession for many Protestants (me included when I was Protestant) is that it presupposes a priesthood. As I said above, Jesus is referred to in Scripture as “the apostle and high priest of our confession.” The former priests were many in number, asHebrews 7:23 says, now we have one priest—Jesus Christ. The question is: how does the idea of priests and confession fit in here? Is there one priest or are there many?
                I Peter 2:5-9 gives us some insight:
                … and like living stones be yourselves built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ… But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s own people…
                If Jesus is the one and only priest in the New Testament in a strict sense, then we have a contradiction in Sacred Scripture. This, of course, is absurd.  I Peter plainly teaches all believers to be members of a holy priesthood. Priest/believers do not take away from Christ’s unique priesthood, rather, as members of his body they establish it on earth.
                FULL AND ACTIVE PARTICIPATIO
                If one understands the very Catholic and very biblical notion ofparticipatio, these problematic texts and others become relatively easy to understand. Yes, Jesus Christ is the “one mediator between God and men” just as I Tim. 2:5 says. The Bible is clear. Yet, Christians are also called to be mediators in Christ. When we intercede for one another or share the Gospel with someone, we act as mediators of God’s love and grace in the one true mediator, Christ Jesus, via the gift of participatioin Christ, the sole mediator between God and men (see I Timothy 2:1-7, I Timothy 4:16, Romans 10:9-14). All Christians, in some sense, can say with St.   Paul, “…it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me…” (Gal. 2:20)
                PRIESTS AMONG PRIESTS
                If all Christians are priests, then why do Catholics claim a ministerialpriesthood essentially distinct from the universal priesthood? The answer is: God willed to call out a special priesthood among the universal priesthood to minister to his people. This concept is literallyas old as Moses.
                When St. Peter taught us about the universal priesthood of all believers, he specifically referred to Exodus 19:6 where God alluded to ancient Israel as “a kingdom of priests and a holy nation.” St. Peter reminds us that there was a universal priesthood among the Old Testament people of God just as in the New Testament. But this did not preclude the existence of a ministerial priesthood within that universal priesthood (see Exodus 19:22, Exodus 28, and Numbers 3:1-12).
                In an analogous way, we have a universal “Royal Priesthood” in the New Testament, but we also have an ordained clergy who have priestly authority given to them by Christ to carry out his ministry of reconciliation as we have seen.
                TRULY AWESOME AUTHORITY
                A final couple of texts we will consider are Matt. 16:19 and 18:18. Specifically, we’ll examine the words of Christ to Peter and the apostles: “Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” As CCC 553 says, Christ here communicated not only authority “to pronounce doctrinal judgments, and to make disciplinary decisions in the Church,” but also “the authority to absolve sins” to the apostles.
                These words are unsettling, even disturbing, to many. And understandably so. How could God give such authority to men? And yet he does. Jesus Christ, who alone has the power to open and shut heaven to men, clearly communicated this authority to the apostles and their successors. This is what the forgiveness of sins is all about: to reconcile men and women with their heavenly Father. CCC 1445 puts it succinctly:
                The words bind and loose mean: whomever you exclude from your communion, will be excluded from communion with God; whomever you receive anew into your communion, God will welcome back into his. Reconciliation with the Church is inseparable from reconciliation with God.
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                Tim Staples is Director of Apologetics and Evangelization here at Catholic Answers, but he was not always Catholic. Tim was raised a Southern Baptist. Although he fell away from the faith of his childhood, Tim came back to faith in Christ during his late teen years through the witness of Christian...


                2 comments:

                1. International humanitarian agency of the Catholic Community in the US pledged to raise US$ 50M for the recovery and rehabilitation programs. 40 Houses for the Yolanda victims in 40 Lenten days project Palo Archbishop John Du said, the project started on Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, and is expected to be finished on Eastern Sunday, which marks the end of the celebration. Holy Roman Catholic long term involvement in the rehabilitation work. Silent but productive

                  Harley Davidson gave Pope Francis a brand new Dyna Super Glide in June last year that the Pope sign and put up for auction, raising a hefty $ 326,000 for Rome soup kitchen and homeless shelter.

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                2. A story that I first heard from Ricky Presa and later confirmed by my own research tells about the time when Napoleon Bonaparte captured Rome and took Pope Pius VI captive. Napoleon, in a burst of anger, told the Pope, " I will destroy the Church in one year." A cardinal who was present responded to Napoleon, "But, sir we have been trying to destroy the Church for 1,800 years with no success. I doubt that you will that you will destroy it in one year." If it were not founded by Christ and guided by the Holy Spirit, it would have been possible to destroy the Church in even less than a year. But the fact remains that the gates of hell will never destroy the Church, a guarantee given by Jesus himself.

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